Hidden immune weakness found in 14% of gravely ill COVID-19 patients

A new study may help explain why men, like this patient in an Italian intensive care unit, are more likely than women to develop life-threatening COVID-19. FLAVIO LO SCALZO/REUTERS/NEWSCOM By Meredith WadmanSep. 24, 2020 , 2:00 PM Science’s COVID-19 reporting is supported by the Pulitzer Center and the Heising-Simons Foundation. From the first months of …

ادامه مطلبHidden immune weakness found in 14% of gravely ill COVID-19 patients

When COVID-19 silenced cities, birdsong recaptured its former glory

White-crowned sparrows can cope with noisy cities, but their songs suffer. JN Phillips By Erik StokstadSep. 24, 2020 , 5:25 PM Science’s COVID-19 reporting is supported by the Pulitzer Center and the Heising-Simons Foundation. White-crowned sparrows are tough birds, able to survive the hustle and bustle of many North American cities. But growing noise pollution …

ادامه مطلبWhen COVID-19 silenced cities, birdsong recaptured its former glory

Newfound brain structure explains why some birds are so smart—and maybe even self-aware

Birds like this homing pigeon may have the necessary neural anatomy for thinking. Ruth Swan/Alamy Stock Photo By Virginia MorellSep. 24, 2020 , 3:50 PM Never before has “bird brain” been such a compliment: In recent years, birds have been found to make tools, understand abstract concepts, and even recognize paintings by Monet and Picasso. …

ادامه مطلبNewfound brain structure explains why some birds are so smart—and maybe even self-aware

How Neanderthals lost their Y chromosome

Neanderthal men unwittingly carried modern human men’s Y chromosomes. Flavio Massari/agefotostock/Newscom By Ann GibbonsSep. 24, 2020 , 2:00 PM Neanderthals have long been seen as uber-masculine hunks, at least compared with their lightweight human cousins, with whom they competed for food, territory, and mates. But a new study finds Homo sapiens men essentially emasculated their …

ادامه مطلبHow Neanderthals lost their Y chromosome

COVID-19 data on Native Americans is ‘a national disgrace.’ This scientist is fighting to be counted

“If you eliminate us in the data, we no longer exist,” says Abigail Echo-Hawk, a citizen of the Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma and director of the Urban Indian Health Institute. KATTY HUERTAS By Lizzie WadeSep. 24, 2020 , 12:20 PM Science’s COVID-19 reporting is supported by the Pulitzer Center and the Heising-Simons Foundation. Abigail Echo-Hawk can’t even count …

ادامه مطلبCOVID-19 data on Native Americans is ‘a national disgrace.’ This scientist is fighting to be counted

Costa Rica is producing a new corps of skilled tropical biologists. But many can’t find jobs at home

A new corps of Costa Rican biologists is studying the country’s rich biodiversity, including this montane forest. GERRY ELLIS/MINDEN PICTURES By Jocelyn KaiserSep. 24, 2020 , 11:50 AM MOUNT CHIRRIPÓ IN COSTA RICA—Framed by drifting clouds, ecologist Andrea Vincent surveyed the hot tub–size dome her students had erected here at nearly 3800 meters, on Costa …

ادامه مطلبCosta Rica is producing a new corps of skilled tropical biologists. But many can’t find jobs at home

Plant trees or let forests regrow? New studies probe two ways to fight climate change

Regrowing trees soak up carbon in Brazil’s Atlantic Forest northeast of Rio de Janeiro. ROBIN CHAZDON By Gabriel PopkinSep. 23, 2020 , 12:25 PM Forests are having their moment. Because trees can vacuum carbon from the atmosphere and lock it away in wood and soil, governments and businesses are embracing efforts to fight climate change …

ادامه مطلبPlant trees or let forests regrow? New studies probe two ways to fight climate change

Watch white blood cells swim with microscopic ‘paddles’

By Lucy HicksSep. 23, 2020 , 11:40 AM Cells have places to be, and they have all evolved different ways to get there: Red blood cells change their shape, and bacteria use whiplike appendages to propel themselves forward. Now, new research suggests white blood cells have their own special way of swimming, which biologists have …

ادامه مطلبWatch white blood cells swim with microscopic ‘paddles’

A sparkling beetle could spell doom for North America’s ash trees

An Asian invader, the emerald ash borer, is killing trees throughout eastern North America. Stephen Ausmus/USDA/Science Source By Elizabeth PennisiSep. 23, 2020 , 12:10 PM An exotic metallic green beetle is eating its way through North American forests, leaving dead ash trees in its wake. In the 20 years since this Asian pest, the emerald …

ادامه مطلبA sparkling beetle could spell doom for North America’s ash trees

The short weird life—and potential afterlife—of quantum radar

By Adrian ChoSep. 23, 2020 , 1:35 PM You might call Jeffrey Shapiro the reluctant godfather of quantum radar. Twelve years ago, the electrical engineer at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) helped develop the key concept underlying this scheme to dramatically increase radar’s sensitivity. But even he doesn’t think the technology will work. “There’s …

ادامه مطلبThe short weird life—and potential afterlife—of quantum radar